The Cockermouth, Keswick & Penrith Railway - Towns and Villages

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The Cockermouth, Keswick & Penrith Railway - Towns and Villages

The Cockermouth, Keswick & Penrith Railway Towns and Villages

Cockermouth - Cockermouth is an ancient market town in the Borough of Allerdale and is so named because it is at the confluence of the River Cocker as it flows into the River Derwent. It has a population of 7,877. Historically a part of Cumberland, Cockermouth is situated just outside the Lake District National Park on its northwest fringe. Much of the architectural core of the town remains unchanged since the basic medieval layout was filled in in the 18th and 19th centuries. The regenerated Market place is now a central historical focus within the town and reflects events during its eight hundred year history. The town is prone to flooding, being flooded in 2005 and again in 2009. Cockermouth has also had many famous pepole born there including William Wordswoth, Fletcher Christian and John Dalton and believe it or not Simon Cowell lived in the town as a child. The original Cockermouth & Workington Railway station was replaced on a new alignment when the Cockermouth railway station opened to passenger traffic on 2 January 1865. The station was immortalised in 1964 in the song "Slow Train" by Flanders and Swann. The station closed on 18 April 1966. The site is now occupied by Cockermouth Mountain Rescue and the Cumbria Fire and Rescue Service Headquarters. The old track bed is now a public footpath.

Embleton - Embleton is a small village located east of Cockermouth on the A66 road, and within the boundaries of the Lake District National Park. Embleton station opened in 1865, on the Cockermouth, Keswick and Penrith Railway, and was closed by British Rail in 1958 although the railway through the village remained until 1966. The trackbed was used for the route of the A66 road.

Braithwaite - Braithwaite is in the northern Lake District it lies just to the west of Keswick and to the east of the Grisedale Pike ridge. The eastern end of the Whinlatter Pass road is in the village. The A66 road bypasses Braithwaite, and does go through the village. Braithwaite Station was situated on the Cockermouth, Keswick and Penrith Railway between Penrith and Cockermouth. The station opened to passenger traffic on 2 January 1865, and closed on 18 April 1966.The station building survives as a private residence.

Bassenthwaite Lake - Bassenthwaite Station is situated between Penrith and Cockermouth. It served the village of Bassenthwaite. The station opened to passenger traffic on 2 January 1865, and closed on 18 April 1966. The station buildings are still visible from the A66 through the trees although the station is in a state of disrepair and now has no roof. The Station Masters house remains on the side of the A66 but the east bound platform and goods yards are now part of the A66 Road.

Keswick - Keswick Nestles between Skiddaw and Derwentwater and has now become the major centre for tourism in the north lakes area. Keswick is a market town and offers a wide range of attractions for visitors, from shops and restaurants to museums and also offers boating trips around lake Derwentwater. Edward I granted the town its market charter in 1276 and the Saturday market continues to this day. Keswick station opened to passenger traffic on 2 January 1865, and closed on 6 March 1972. The station building still exists and is now part of the Keswick hotel. Keswick Museum and Art Gallery has many items on display which are connected to the railway, including the barrow and spade used to cut the first sod of earth for the railway from 21 May 1862 along with train tickets from the 19th century and a platform guard's whistle.

Briery Bobbin Mill - Briery Bobbin Mill had a halt for the mill. Around 120 bobbin mills used to operate in the Lake District producing almost half of the worlds wooden bobbins. Briery Bobbin Mill alone exported over 40 million bobbins per year at itís peak. If put end to end the row of bobbins would be around 800 miles long. The mill closed in 1961 due to the collapse of the British textile industry and increased competition from abroad. The station opened in 1922, and closed on 15th November 1958

Threlkeld - The Cockermouth, Keswick and Penrith Railway line ran past Threlkeld Quarry and provided daily transport for workers and school children living along the line. Despite extensions of the Quarry to Klondike, Spion Cop and Bram Crag which were connected by a light railway further extraction became impractical and the quarry closed in 1982. Since 1996 the quarry has become a visitor attraction with the opening of the Threlkeld Mining and Quarrying Museum. The station closed on 6th March 1972

Troutbeck - There is not much at Troutbeck but nearby are the Troutbeck Inn, Sportsman Inn, several Guest Houses/B&B, a camp and a Caravan Club site.

Penruddock - Penruddock originated in Celtic times but the origin of its name is not certain, it is known that Pen is a Celtic name for 'hill' and 'rhuddawc' mean red in Welsh and the Soil in the vicinity is reddish in colour. The station opened to passenger traffic on 2 January 1865, and closed on 6 March 1972.

Blencow - Blencow near Penrith is sited on the Petteril river, which divides it into two parts: Great and Little Blencow. The Blencow family lived in the area from the early 1300s. A partly fortified house, Blencow hall, not the original seat of the family, was built in the late 1500s and has a ruined tower at each end, one dating from the 1600s. The station opened to passenger traffic on 2 January 1865 and closed on 6th March 1972.

Penrith - Penrith is a large town acting as a regional centre for the eastern Lake District, lying just outside the National Park. Its position on the strategic route to and from Scotland has resulted, since Roman times, in its development as a military centre. Penrith was once the capital of Cumbria. The attractive town is the hub of the Eden Valley. It is an important shopping centre, with a good mix of traditional shops and sophisticated arcades. Leading off Penrith's main streets are many old yard entrances with interesting inscriptions on the lintels. It remains an important station on the main west coast railway line.


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